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. but i do believe in education. i believe we should invest in our education systems. smaller classes. no high-capacity schools, because they produce morons. the great and the good want their kids to have the best. you mentioned something that i disagree with. the reason why american consumers consume more than europeans is not a cause of some kind of fundamental cultural difference. what you have -- first, america was the only country that had been effectively untouched by the war. so you had more consumption for durables. i am not sure that americans -- naturally, americans would be the first to enjoy them. then, after that, what you have is a massive reduction in the real wage, the real median wage. i do not know if you know that. today we do not have a real median wage that is anywhere near where it was in 1972. what has been the effect between 1970's and 2008 is that living standards were being pushed into the ground, hours were being expanded to make ends meet. real hourly wages were declining. they were working longer hours. that put enormous strain on families. my friends in
makes me mad. >> this is what goes on in higher education. it is increasing revenue for the insiders and not worry the students . not talk about $100 application how about 400 billion we spend on higher education and producing graduates who don't have the skills that our economies. >> morg oon. going back to thedea of a scam. it is it better than seeing it loosened in the classroom. >> and in thepped of the day. paying 60,000 for the students is watered down. and don't blame the application fee and blame the government subsidies. >> hold on, there st. a scam. >> it is fair to call it a scam and colleges are trying fobring in more applicants. it is news and world report that they are trying to move up on. >> and thin - then they are saying parents and young people are dumkophs. >> and hold on. john wants in. >> can we stop crying for the happenplicant. they know the game. >> they don't unless i are watching the show. >> and every college applicant looks at u.s. news world reports and do it on rankings. they are playog their need and to suspect they are taken advantage of is laughable.
in indelible inc.. a blueprint for an america of continental red, network transportation, widespread education and industrial might. at the same time these 12 terrible months revealed the dreadful cost of entry into that future. payable in blood and misery on battlefields from shiloh sharpsburg, do you bridge to fredericksburg. most of all though, 1862 was the year lincoln rose to greatness. never since the founding of the country has so much depended on the judgment, the cunning, the timing and the sheer physical endurance of one man. now how lincoln survived and ultimately triumphed through 1862 is a very good story but it takes a whole book to tell. tonight i would like to talk for a few minutes with you about why lincoln poured everything he had into the struggle. why was it so important to him to save the union? why fight a war that cost more american lives than all of our other wars put together? three-quarters of a million people dead and countless more wounded in body and in mind. to understand this story, i must take you back another 50 plus years before 1862, to a winter day in febru
-secondary education. canadas taxes pay for universal health care. the french pay fewer taxes than americans do and are less happy. only the japanese actually make sense, they pay higher taxes, 47.2% and they are less satisfied with what they end up with. fareed zakaria is the host of cnn's fareed zakaria gps and has a special on sunday at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. entitled "tough decisions." i asked him are american taxpayers getting their money's worth. >> imagine a guy in germany, probably he pays particularly if he's upper middle class or upper class, he probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpart. though it's not entirely clear once you add value-added consumption tax, for sure he's paying more. but here's what he gets in return. he gets universal health care, high-quality. he gets a free education. from kindergarten through any master's bachelor's ph.d. program he wants and it's pretty high quality as well. he gets free retraining if he ever loses his job. he gets all the benefits like day care and things like that europe is famous for. and the person in the united stat
they're happier? because it pays for free education, post secondary, canadi canadians, by the way, pay more than the u.s., as well, 46.4% in taxes. why are they happier? because their taxes pay for universal health care. the french pay fewer taxes than americans do and are less happy. we don't know why that happens. the japanese make sense. higher taxes, 47.2%, and they are less satisfied with what they end up with. fareed zakaria is the host of "fareed zakaria: gps." he's got a special on sunday at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. eastern titled "tough decisions." i asked him, are american taxpayers getting their money's worth? >> imagine a guy in germany. probably he pays, particular pi upper middle class or upper class, probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpart, though it's not xwirly clear once you add value-added tax consumption. >> good point. >> but here's what he gets in return. he gets universal health care, high quality, he gets a free education from kindergarten through any master's, bachelor's, ph.d. program he wants and it's pretty high quality as well. he ge
. and to give them land and to give them livestock into pay for the transportation and education, transportation especially to someplace where they could live undisturbed as free people. and it's interesting, when this bit of information came out in the smithsonian magazine an excerpt from the book, a number of people said to me that they had never heard of it. and i said i never heard of it either until i stumbled across this in philadelphia. and a couple people have thought about this. the parlor game when you hope your book is being made into a movie, who do want to start in it, people began to say i wonder whom he could free? people thought of john and priscilla hemings. they said well, maybe he could have freed some of his farmers, and then someone said, the faucets. he could've freed joe. you was a blacksmith. and ed was his cook and had a whole bunch of children. and it turned out any auction of jefferson's estate after the war, and after his death, joseph was in 13. jefferson left the rest of the family in slavery, and they're scattered to different masters. and joseph worked for 10 year
specific education. the topic i will be discussing today is not the topic -- such is the point of clarification. that is black history month are women's history month or presidents' day. we are we are going to talk about my new book, "affairs of the state" and what i was trying to get at with the book was that rather than just tell stories about presidential history, the book is not just about the whodunit, but who did it and who didn't do it or with whom. i have tried to find a new lens and a new way of setting presidential characters. for example 12 years ago i read a book on the first lady and i thought it would be important to understand the presidents from a different angle. that is why not study the person that knew them the best? for example what possibly could i as an historian could should be to the body of knowledge on lincoln or george washington? pretty much everything that could be written about linking -- lincoln or washington probably has been written. the rate historians whose figures point to pouring through the letters and the evidence of a book on i can or th
to grow up. i feel like if you do these little things, in the education system from sixth grade through 12th grade every year -- everyone knows who george washington is, but you should have a class every year that allows you to live in a better neighborhood and allows you to buy a home, and giving people a credit, and allows them to get a car with a low-interest rate. guest: a real problem in american education is we are no longer in a position to require high personal standards. good example, when i was in college, i got a piece of paper when i was a freshman, i went to a state teachers college in new york state, wonderful institution. they said we expect our students and i read with to endure to my personal standards or we will throw you out of here. that's basically what the paper said. that then filters down. we don't have that anymore. instead we hear about people come from different backgrounds and different cultures. i came from different backgrounds and a difficult to prevent him from an italian immigrant family in new york city. my father was aborted or salesman. his father was a
founders were not so foolish as to suppose that freedom can thrive or survive without appropriate education and nourishments of character. they understood this must mean education broadly understood to include not just schools, but all the institutions of civil society that explain freedom and equip citizens with the virtues freedom requires. these virtues includes self- control, modernization. these reinforce the rationality essential to human happiness. notice when madison like the founding father's generally spoke of human nature, he was not speaking as modern progressives do as manage inconstant, something evolving, something constantly formed and reformedly changing social and other historical forces. when people today speak of nature, they generally speak of flora and trees and animals and other things not human. but the founders spoke of nature as a guide to and as a measure of human action. they thought of nature not as something merely to be manipulated for human convenience but rather as a source of norms to be discovered. they understood that natural rights could not be asserted,
eye on 2016. okay, when we come back, from energy to education, to technology. our panel's pick for the good news story of the year. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> well, just when you thought there wasn't that much to cheer
of the epa. they talk about the cannot of education, the department of agency and epa waste of money. >> cost too much, all about regulations. are you one of the few people employed to this organization who has been to north korea. >> twice. i hope to go back again soon. >>> just ahead, a warning to democrats from republicans, they will not write a blank check to solve the fiscal cliff. reaction from debbie snab now of michigan, next. >>> plus, the best selling river of "gone baby gone" and mystic river" has a new crime to solve. where is his dog? dennis lahane is asking for help finding his dog tessa. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi
votes and cut those deals in part because of his lifelong political education. he began it as a young man in well yams burg, he listened to patrick henry said -- he spoke of henry, he spoke as homer wrote and loved that, partly because he couldn't do it. it's always a good sign when they recognize qualities in orrs which they don't pez. that kind of humility, however relative that term is in talking about this species called politicians is a virtue. he learned how to master the ways and means of politics because of that disastrous governorship. i think he was much faster to react to louisiana when the purchase became open and a possibility. as you'll remember, basically, napoleon is going to sell this to us, one of the great real estate deals ever. and jefferson immediately in 1803 begins to think, well, we're going to have to amend the constitution to do it because he was a strict constructionist, right? he had followed alexander hamilton over broad presidential powers. then about the third week of august, 1803 -- that was the fourth of july. about the third or week of august he gets
an education -- [applause] >> i guess the question is of fairness. you shouldn't have two systems, one where based on your race or class you can access treatment and move on with your life and another one where because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has grown. these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for it. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and you have to do battle with th
as did finding myself in this arena in having this incredible awakening and education. since i left the duke ellington school, i have often gone back to give master classes and work with young singers. my agency would often scheduled concert with master classes. again known in the industry has teaching younger -- i get known in the industry as teaching younger students. we have a number of to the -- we have a number of tickets we give away or offer at a discounted price. i remember when i was a student and saw my first opera. it was because the kennedy center and extended a certain amount of tickets for students to come. i realized there is a tremendous responsibility. it is also a pleasure to want to share this gorgeous art form with people and young people in particular. i know the impact and difference it made in my life have been known at 13 this is what i wanted to do. it gave me a direction and purpose. i never suffered under pressure of my desire to keep up with the latest. when i would go to a voice lesson or concert, there was no synthetic that could provide me with that ki
. that is why my children are staying right here. >> it is a rumor that is depriving children of an education despite the fact that doctors in the camp have not found a single case of tb. the family has a new neighbor. three days ago, he fled with his wife and children to jordan. for now, they have to live in a tent until there is a container for them. the temperature is sometimes below freezing. it is very tough. >> we have children and it is terribly cold at night. i have asked for more blankets, but they told me i had to wait. >> her eldest son wants to leave the camp. he received death threats after an argument. stranded without any prospects for the future, frustration can easily turn into violence, but the security forces will not let him out. the jordanian government wants to prevent syrian refugees from going underground. meanwhile, aisha is terrified the violence of the syrian civil war could spread to the camp. >> i want to leave. my children and i want to go home. >> but she knows, and so do her children, that there is no going back. >> in the united states, house speaker john boeh
education to change the behavior of a driver by a combination of countermeasures together to change the situation. >> reporter: with so many cars on the road, campaigns to increase safety are bound to land. but gradually safety-conscious people are making inroads. takafumi terui, nhk world, beijing. >>> iran will conduct naval drills for six days in the strait of hormuz in the persian gulf. the exercise is apparently meant to showcase its military strength in the world's vital oil and gas shipping route. iran's naval commander told reporters the drills will begin on friday. they'll involve areas across the strait of hormuz and northern parts of the indian ocean. the commander said the drill will test the navy's missile systems, combat ships and submarines, and iranian-made spy drones. he said the exercises are intended to counter threats from enemy countries. iran carried out similar drills last december and january. officials have said that iran might block the strait. this prompted the u.s. to send a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier to the area. analysts say iran will conduct the
the individual, military did education and training? -- education and training? i agree that you have to start at the provincial and district level. which is the right model to go with here? mr. affleck, you talked about 27 different militia types of groups. when we try to focus on couple, which does not -- kabul, which is not extent beyond the city limits. what has to come first for us to be on the track to success? >> it to get international security assistance peace right and you have african nations, including uganda and rwanda and participate, that gives you some breathing space to move on. that is the essential thing that first. to happen first brok >> you have to deal with governments, but obviously creating greater security -- >> governments at which level? "you cannot frankly do real governance of the provisional level with governors unless you're dealing with the capital, because of the nature of the congolese government. you start where you are, and you have monusco, with no real effectiveness, try to bring in units or create a new unit within it that has that capacity. if i were fo
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a la of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ grr! hi, neighbour! grr! i'm daniel tiger, and this is tigey! grr! we're playing jungle! (chattering) want to play? put on your binoculars like this. ooh! there's my jungle
is trying to provide the children at the camp with education, teaching them how to read, write, and drop. the children's drawings illustrate the impact of the war on their lives and the months many have spent in the camp. >> this is the helicopter of b ashar al assad. until a few months ago, about 5000 people live here. now there are four times that number. the refugees are glad to have a roof over their heads. osama hassan from aleppo spent months in a tent. >> i just wanted to get over the border. a turkish border soldiers shot me in the leg without warning. they are not letting anyone through any more. >> it is hard for the syrian air force because of its proximity to the border. that is why the three syrian army set up their command center here. they have been planning their offensives in damascus and aleppo from a former school building. however, their tasks are changing as they take areas from government troops, and they have to look after the people. >> almost every third soldier among our troops has been pulled back from the front and put toward doing civilian tasks. >> such prob
effort. is the education, this plan -- the discipline. congolese military is riddled with problems, but just the simple training and discipline and has made a difference. we have ongoing efforts on the rule of law and military justice. we spend millions of dollars to work with the military during a wholesale way on mentor ship and to make sure that human rock -- human rights and the law are instilled drought. -- instill that throughout. >> and where you have seen efforts not working at all, where is it? is it the same? >> again, the challenges are paramount. these are forces that do not howff a great amount of discipline. they do not have great training. enda in many cases, they do not have great education. there is a capacity problem within the drc, and it makes it harder to try to train them up in a way that meets the standards that we would like to see in the military. >> would you like to comment further? gregg's yes, i would. -- >> yes, i would. i would like to say that security sector reform in the army has been a failure, for the most part. it is a failure because of all of
were on our site. the idea was the state cannot make an educational opportunity available for one sex only. in any event, that left justice scalia as the lone dissenter in the vmi case. now, the case about the family medical leave act and the chiefs understanding that it was important not to make this a maternity leave, that it should be part of the workers life when you have a sick child, a sick spouse, a sick parent, you can take time off for that putting did the job in jeopardy. well, i'd like to say that i had something to do with it. i don't think that's too. i think a case that came before the court influenced him. but most of all, i think he was influenced by his granddaughte granddaughters. one of his daughters was divorced and she had two girls, and the old chief cut took responsibility for being a male parent figure for those girls. they loved him, and i think he, he thought about how he would like the world to be for them. >> when you think about this evolution, starting really didn't read versus reed in 1971, which was a case involving an idaho probate law that said males
house" which lays out a radical vision of education in the future of america, and the marriage of traditional classroom and digital technology, employing them in a way that flips our traditional model of education. >> by the way, carn appeared on our afterwards program so if you want to watch that author, type in his name. long history between 12 and christopher hitchens. >> long history. we published christopher, "god is not great" in 2007. a number one "new york times" best seller. after that book we published his first memoir, followed last september by an essay collection called "arguably." also went on to be a best seller, but together under extreme circumstances. he was very ill at the time. we hoped to publish a book -- a long are -- longer book about his illness but we corrected the article for vanity fair. >> you're going to be at the miami book fair next week, november 17th, 18th, along with carol blue, and martin amos. >> that's going to be a really interesting panel to be on. martin and christopher knew each other for a very long time. carol and martin are very clos
anticipated, when women get education, access to birth control and some autonomy over their lives and bodies, the birth rate really falls off the cliff. in mexico it's amazing how quickly it's happened. >> and hispanic-americans, right? >> yes, in the u.s. as well. and then there's the question of climate. can we, if we keep putting carbon in the atmosphere, and we can only put a fifth of the carbon and hope to make temperatures which i harp on all the time -- >> two degrees celsius, there's a lot that we have to leave in the ground. christian, how do you think about how compatible our models of growth are with avoiding climate disaster? >> well, you know, the limits of growth had two areas. one is that they were running out of resources and running out of sinks. we have found more oil, we find more resources. they have been correct in terms of the earth capacity to absorb pollution. >> what does sink mean? >> a place to put the ability to absorb -- >> the ocean has absorbed enormous amounts of c02. they were right about the plilis of the earth's ability to absorb this. but there's a problem
jennings when i was director of education at james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innocences of james madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subjects of the day, and during his reti
that picture. and it's part of the education of john f. kennedy. one thing i like about president kennedy, he was raw, he was green, but he did learn on the job. he was bullied by kruschev in 1961, he had a rough summer in berlin, but he learned. and by the time to have cuban missile crisis in 1962, he's a great president. you listen to the tapes, and i have for a book i wrote about bobby kennedy, half of the sessions are taped, president kennedy's great. particularly on the last day, the 13th day when everybody's starting to get a little nervous, you can hear the voices get a little squeaky, president kennedy is cool. and he understands we have to make a deal with the russians. we have to do it secretly, but we have to make a deal with them. and thank god he had a couple of years to learn on the job, because he did in the end handle the crisis well. and some of his education came from president eisenhower. anybody else? thank you very much. [applause] >> visit the author's web site, evanthomasbooks.com. >> with a month left in 2012, many publications are putting together their year-end lists
or nothing guy, and kennedy gets the picture. it's part of the education with kennedy. what i like about kennedy is he was raw and green, but he learned on the ground. he was bullied at the vienna summit, a rough summer with berlin, but he learned, and by the time of the cuban missile crisis in 1962, he's a great president. listen to the tapes of the missile crisis, and i have for a book i wrote on bobby kennedy, after the tapes, kennedy sounds great. president kennedy, particularly on the last day, the 13th day everybody's getting nervous, you hear voices getting squeaky, president kennedy is cool understanding we need a deal, russians, secretly, but have to make a deal with them, and thank god there was a couple years to learn on the job, and because he did in the end handle the crisis well. some of the education came from president eisenhower. anybody else? thank you very much. [applause] >>> for more information visit the author's website at evanthomasbooks.com. >> booktv on location at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland interviews professors who a also authors. we are joi
children. you are against children? you don't like education? so you go on the moral defensive. so it's not enough to say free markets work. if people feel free markets are somehow a moral, that is sort of a semi-corrupt bargain but they give us material things so we put up with this, it will wither away. it will die. we are trying to say no, free markets don't deliver goods. they deliver good because it's based on morality, amoral optimism about the future. you don't make an investment if you think is that a future. you don't take a risk if you have an environment of pessimism. you take the risk and think i may lose everything, but it may work so i'll try it. that's why you get that optimism and free markets. >> and "freedom manifesto" there is a list of federal taxes in here. accounts receivable tax cut building permit tax, corporate income tax, dog license tax, federal income tax, phishing attacks, iris don't take him a local income tax, luxury taxes for a marriage license tax, payroll, real estate tax and i'm kind of editing as they go here come the social security tax, trailer re
, broke through the door and captured all men in the pillbox. remarkably the lieutenant was educated in the united states and he said i am ready to surrender. lieutenant edmonds said to him take me to the commander of the fort and that is exactly what he did. with his tongue begun in his side the fabulous four went through the battery, down an elevator, went through an amphitheater that looked like a football field and they went into the depths of the guns of navarrone type situation. and the commanding officer's office and he decided to break through the door and the commanding officer gave him -- what you want? we would like you to surrender the 4 ridge. the commanding officer's -- he was incredulous. you are only four men. he picked up the telephone and said you are my prisoner. at that point, robert edmond had one of the greatest bluffs of world war ii, pull out a hand grenade and put it between his legs and said you are going to surrender. at that point, eight hundred men surrendered after rebroadcast that over the loudspeaker. incredible story of world war ii that is completely
. but i do believe in education. i believe we should invest in our education systems. smoker -- smaller class is. -- now one high a capacity schools because they produce morons. the great and the good want their kids to have the best. you mentioned something that i dis agree with. the reason why american consumers consume more than europeans is not a cause of some kind of punishment -- fundamental cultural difference. what you have -- first, america was the only country that had been effectively untouched by the war. so you had more consumption for durables. i am not sure that americans -- naturally, americans would be the first to enjoy them. then, after that, what you have is a massive reduction in the real wage, the real median wage. i do not know if you know that. today we do not have a real median wage that is anywhere near where it was in 1976. -- 1972. what has been the effect between 1970's and 2008 is that living standards were being pushed into the ground, hours were being expanded to make ends meet. real hourly wages were declining. they were working longer hours. output enor
that the department of energy or the department of education and the number of employees they have. we do not need all that. they can cut the number of employees in half and we would have real savings. nobody will address these issues. i'll hang up. guest: when you have a budget in washington, it is hard to cut back politically. if you do, people say you are against the were the goal. this worthy goal, that worthy goal. there was a british historian in the 1950's. after world war i, britain had the largest navy in the world and they reduced the size of the navy. the laid-off sailors and dock workers. the agency running the navy was getting bigger as the navy was getting smaller. he made the discovery -- the size of a bureaucracy has nothing to do with the amount of work the bureaucracy does. it will grow unless it is reined in. the bureaucracy was getting bigger. if you get that kind of bloat, get in trouble and you change or go out of business. ronald reagan said the closest thing to immortality is a government agency. caller: good morning, everybody. do you think capitalism and privatizing is withdr
to entertainment, it's education. call me. fiscal cliff talks. let's be optimistic. use the word stall. the president gave us a little hope tonight that an agreement to avert a middle class tax hike could still occur next week. saw the breakdown play hideously in the session today. dow shrimping 120 points. nasdaq diving .96%. it makes sense the market got a whacking when you consider that the speaker of the house didn't have enough votes in his own party to push through any tax increases and the president says there's got to be some. that's even for people making more than a million bucks. it was for show. the president would have vetoed the bill. he insisted again that he will not -- tonight, he's not about to let the rich get away with it, whatever that means. we have been worried that since the election the politicians won't rise above partisanship and come to an agreement. we at cnbc have taken an historic position. get a deal done for the good of the country. what faces us is worrisome. nation could see 2 million jobs loss. slashing of unemployment benefits when you are laying pe
advocates the way. we for young minds of education programs. were helping to build the free institutions of the middle east with women's fellowship since it will help wounded warriors and other veterans and their families through military service initiative. today is the president said this about economic freedom, which is the surest route to growth. as president bush wrote in his forward to 4% solution, free-market capitalism offers the most efficient and just way to order an economy. such a system allows individuals to decide the course of their alliance. this book does not exist in a vacuum. side of the 4% growth product had eight in nitish lays. the product began at smu in the spring of 2011. i know many of you were there. the hard top economists and started a website. we held a second conference on tax policy in may in new york and we have an event scheduled in september in chicago that will feature governor mitch daniels. like the project as a whole, this book seeks americans as our economic problems as a way to advance opportunity and prosperity. we are currently growing at 2%. th
in investment banking. could you explain more about that? i know you have gained a lot of financial education since he started as the t.a.r.p. general. could you explain how this will work? >> yes, glass-steagall was the law that separated investment banks and commercial banks. so it meant that basically a big like citibank or jpmorgan chase could not also do investment banking activities. also in other areas like insurance. that bill really got dismantled by a series of regulatory deficiencies by the feds leading up to the end of the clinton administration for the last messages were basically torn apart by legislation. the way president obama is referring to it, and he is accurate, some of the biggest classes didn't happen from commercial banks. but also investment banks. it was pure investment banking or an insurance company like aig. this is a popular thing that is done by those on wall street that want to keep the status quo, too big to fail, they want to keep it going. those of them that advocate the law, it's not necessary. i think you look at a bank like citigroup, which clearly suffer
think we know what to do? >> i think there's a lot that could be done. it involves education, it involves investing in infrastructure which we should be doing and, frankly, i think all of that would take time. the best thing we can do to make up for the $750 billion a year whole in labor compensation that has arisen because of technological change is ring as much of the waste out of health care as possible. workers take home pay suffers by that amount. >> i had health care written down here and that was the elephant in the room we didn't talk about when we talked about government spending right now. i know peter has worked on it really hard. but something that is really sad for me looking forward about the u.s. economy is a lot has been done. i think even morally, it's terrific that americans are going to be covered. but the system hasn't really been rationalized and that is a big drag on the u.s. economy. >> i think there is much more progress that is being made, not just because of policy, but because insurance firms are pushing this way and insurance firms are pushing this
such an incredible opportunity, a platform where we perform op ra, sim fonic music, educational projects will go up immediately because all the schools, universities, city of five million people. you can perform one leg nut cracker 20 time ace year, you can perform 50 times a year, each of those 50 nuts crackers a year you can devote 40 to schools it is a huge opportunity to help young people understand their part draft decision. because of course they have all these toys and also kid does it all the time but they will go for the first time at 8 or 9 years old to see the magic of theatre. most of them will come back, we know that most of them will come back. it's much easy everto start at 8, 9, 10 and then understand ballet, opera, theatre, music, rather than do it when are you 25, 30 for its first time. it's too late, maybe. >> back to politics for a moment. when you look at russia today, democracy, economic growth, human rights, press freedom. where do you think they are on those issues? >> i think for the country which has 20 years history, if you start from breakup of soviet union, things are l
in a community afflicted by and foreclosures. those children show their scars in their educational development of personal development and emotional development for years to come. every time i hear some conservative politician explain why we have not got the resources to do something about unemployment, another one of these economic downturns of capitalism to lyle was scratched my head because even the most conservative calculation would indicate that the cost of not doing something is larger. ought to have been undertaken long ago. just as in this case, the most stunning thing if you are a normal thinking person would be to ask yourself, the last time we had a crisis like this, the last time capitalisms and stability took this terrible turn in the 1930's something very different happened then is happening now. major steps were taken by a democratic president's, middle of the rover, mr. obama, everything changed and he wasn't a big middle of the road. he became something else and a lot of things for the people. none of those are being done now that is a remarkable difference in the way you han
think local education decisions are best made at the local level. >> senator who says is he a quote strong supporter of second amendment rights maintains that the solutions to shootings like the one in connecticut will be found in families, faith, communities and in medicine. jamie? >> all right. we hope the solution is found. molly, thank you. well, for many 6 those families in newtown, connecticut, this is a heart-breaking christmas. can you imagine one without your loved ones if they died in that elementary school massacre? >> every single second that i think of newtown and i think of every parent who lost a child whether they celebrated christmas, hanukkah or anything else, i think of how do you get through christmas? what happens if that saturday was the day they were going to take them to santa. what happens if that was the day you sent them to see santa and that's the last picture you have? >> truly unimaginable. messages of love and hope have come in all over newtown. people donating toys and books clothing and money. a local official says all the donations and support have
. host: at any time take after his father whether he would study classical education, becomes? guest: when he was five or six he was writing his only little history of medieval warfare. i stayed back. we played a wonderful video g e game, age of kings. it is very -- you build your own castles and that was -- i let little play it as much as he wanted to. he took to reading and he loves histo faulkner. he is a reader. so, i just stand back because he will go wherever he goes. host: go back there. what about the 1980's. what work did you do then? guest: at a certain point after factories and bar tending my father had been an employee, the japanese with call him a company man in a small manufacturing company outside of boston and he had moved from sales manager to vice president to president without any equity. my brother and i both worked there in high school in the factory. the company made steams valves and heavy iron castings for steam traps on oil lines or submarines. it was lit manufacturing but -- light manufacturing but dirty, dusty. that is what our summer jobs consisted of. my
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